Palliative vs Hospice Care

What is palliative care?  What is hospice care? 

The major difference between palliative and hospice care is palliative care is focused on nutrition, pain control and help during a life-threatening illness.  Hospice care typically provides comfort care only for presumably the last six months of your life but may be renewed up to a year.  Palliative care is for help in surviving a disease process with the least amount of pain and disruption to your family life.  So what are the reasons to accept palliative or hospice care?  “All things shared make all things easier”.  The doctors, nurses and aides have years of experience in knowing the ‘tricks of the trade’ and will gladly share their knowledge to help you through the disease.  My favorite tip is using a capful of mouthwash in a bedside commode after each use to kill germs and smell great!  Do not be afraid to accept help but enjoy the extra hands helping you navigate through each day as you face the need for either palliative or hospice care.

Fresh Air

The sun is shining. The grass and leaves are a fresh new green. Mosquitoes are not abundant, yet. May is a beautiful month to be outdoors.  However, caregivers often are ‘stuck’ indoors and cannot appreciate the beauty of God’s world except through the window. Friends of Caregivers: I would like to encourage you to give of your time to sit with someone and allow the caregiver to go out and breathe the fresh air.  Caregivers: Accept help! 

My husband once encouraged me to take a break and go out for a while. I gladly accepted the offer and came back much more relaxed and refreshed; ready to be a caregiver again! You and your loved ones can both benefit from the fresh air!

Acts 14:17b “He did good, and gave us rain from heaven, and fruitful seasons, filling our hearts with food and gladness.”

The sun is shining. The grass and leaves are a fresh new green.  Mosquitos are not abundant yet. May is a beautiful month to be outdoors.  However, caregivers often are ‘stuck’ indoors and cannot appreciate the beauty of God’s world except through the window. Friends of Caregivers: I would like to encourage you to give of your time to sit with someone and allow the caregiver to go out and breathe the fresh air.  Caregivers: Accept help! My husband once encouraged me to take a break and go out for a while.  I gladly accepted the offer and came back much more relaxed and refreshed; ready to be a caregiver again!  You and your loved ones will benefit from the fresh air!

 

Acts 14:17b

“He did good, and gave us rain from heaven, and fruitful seasons, filling our hearts with food and gladness.”

Thought for today:  Celebrate God’s renewal of the earth and your heart!

Easter

 

Easter:  What comes to mind? Sunrise services, Easter bunnies, jelly beans, new outfits?  All of these are definitely a part of today’s culture, but take a moment and think of one of the last things Jesus said from the cross: 

     John 19:25-27, "Now there stood by the cross of Jesus his mother, and     his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Cleophas, and Mary Magdalene.     When Jesus therefore saw his mother, and the disciple standing     by, whom he loved, he saith unto his mother, Woman, behold thy     son! Then saith he to the disciple, Behold thy mother! And from that hour that disciple took her unto his own home."

One of Jesus last thoughts was that of a caregiver.  Jesus as the eldest son was culturally responsible for the caregiving responsibilities of his mom. He made sure she would receive loving care after he was gone! 

Wow – have you ever thought of Jesus as a caregiver in the context of His last sayings from the cross? No matter how hard it is for us right now, Jesus had it harder and he also asked for help!  Jesus is our perfect example

Accepting Help

For Caregivers, this day may seem like any other day or perhaps additional family members may come in and help. Take time to expect and accept help.  It can be expensive to hire outside help. Church families – we are always sensitive to meals needed but what about time? If you have a homebound member of the church, start a CARE CALENDAR for staying during the day with the homebound. This can be helpful for one to five hours while the caregiver catches up on shopping, cleaning or even sleep!  Food is always a blessing but personal time is a blessing as well!